Global Accreditation Body for Scrum and Agile Certifications

Scrum for Enterprise

Scaling Scrum for Enterprise consists of following processes:

Please wait...
  1. Create Program or Portfolio Components—In this process, the Program or Portfolio Product Owner and key stakeholders identify common components and resources required for the program or portfolio. The Minimum Done Criteria are defined and all stakeholders are identified.
    Following figure shows the relationship of the Create Program or Portfolio Components process to the fundamental Scrum processes.
  2. Review and Update Scrum Guidance Body—In this process, the Scrum Guidance Body Recommendations are regularly reviewed by the members of the Scrum Guidance Body and are updated when and if necessary. In this process, changes in the membership of the Scrum Guidance Body are also handled.
    Following figure shows the relationship of the Review and Update Scrum Guidance Body process to the fundamental Scrum processes.
  3. Create and Groom Program or Portfolio Backlog—In this process, the Program or Portfolio Backlog is created, updated, and maintained. Suggested improvements for the Scrum Guidance Body Recommendations may be made and implementation deadlines may be adjusted based on changed requirements and/or progress of the projects in the program or portfolio.
    Following figure shows the relationship of the Create and Groom Program or Portfolio Backlog process to the fundamental Scrum processes.
  4. Coordinate Program or Portfolio Components—In this process, components of the program or portfolio are coordinated. Dependencies between projects are addressed, common impediments are discussed, and best practices are shared. Sometimes, recommendations for improvements of the Scrum Guidance Body are made.
    Following figure shows the relationship of the Coordinate Program or Portfolio Components process to the fundamental Scrum processes.
  5. Retrospect Program or Portfolio Releases—In this process, the Program or Portfolio Product Owner and key stakeholders get together to retrospect a program or portfolio Release and internalize the lessons learned. Often, these lessons learned lead to agreed actionable improvements to be implemented in future releases. Sometimes, improvements to the Scrum Guidance Body may be recommended.
    Following figure shows the relationship of the Retrospect Program or Portfolio Releases process to the fundamental Scrum processes.